Thermidor

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Billy Pratt

Homosexuality as Suburban Invasion in "A Nightmare on Elm Street"

Under the fascist progressive American regime, the rainbow flag has replaced the swastika. Like store-owners with Nazi flags in their shop windows, modern corporations trip over one another to signal the rainbow- "signal the rainbow, stay under the radar," they say. There was something admirable in the state's declaration of homosexual normalization in that it left no room for interpretation. The White House was drenched in the rainbow, all power-players in the American landscape had better get

The Entitled Boomer and "Vacation" (1983)

"I found out long ago, it's a long way down the holiday road" Believe it or not, Clark W. Griswold was pretty fucking masculine. Sure, "Vacation" (1983) featured a kind of proto-idiot Dad, a trope that would become the standard by 1990- but Clark was a different kind of idiot Dad. Clark was a masculine idiot Dad. "Vacation" relied on repeating the same one joke with Clark, but luckily it was a good one. When Clark would do something stupid, royally screwing things up or putting his family in d

Underachievers: Nirvana, Green Day, and Generation-X

Toward the end of 1990, you couldn't get away from Simpsons merchandise- from posters, to pajama sets, to pencil toppers- mostly featuring Generation-X's very first mainstream media icon, Bart Simpson. You see, before "The Simpsons" became obsessed with Homer's gradual decline into retardation, the show's initial protagonist was skateboarding prankster Bart- the country's first take on their next generation. And those savvy Simpsons writers seemed to have nailed it. While Bart's driving characte

The Narrative of Heartbreak and “Big” (1988)

In a flash Amy was able to transform our hetero-normative experience back into something she was more comfortable with, her own safe space of gender neutrality, with the magic words: "get this shit off me." Tossing her the tissue box, I chastised her for breaking the narrative, something usually reserved for slightly longer than fifteen seconds after sex. Amy may have rolled her eyes, but the fact of the matter remains: sex is the narrative of attraction. For the red-hot 20 minutes I spent with

Authenticity and “The Cable Guy”

There was a gleam in her eye when “Ghostbusters” (2016) came up in the group’s discussion. She corrected the speaker, a male, who didn’t make an elaborate point to reference the movie’s notorious gender component- “the new Ghostbusters” he offhandedly called it, but this was “girl Ghostbusters,” she said with pride. After all, she was a high school Science teacher and this was a victory with which she could attach herself. This attachment was the point, existing independently of the movie. She m