Thermidor

© 2017 Thermidor Magazine.

Designed by Jonathan.

N.T. Carlsbad

Wanderer trying to rediscover the classical counterrevolutionary tradition. Blogs at https://carlsbad1819.wordpress.com

Royalist and Rousseauist All the Same

Proprietors, whoever you are, beware of supporting a false doctrine. Men who have nothing are not your equals. -- Antoine Joseph de Barruel-Beauvert, Cri de l'honneur et de la vérité aux proprietaires (1792) What little we know of Antoine Joseph de Barruel-Beauvert's (it appears his nobiliary particle is disputed) biography presents quite the fascinating picture. Born in 1757, he serves as a militiaman, was an attempted savior of Louis XVI, a royalist newspaper editor after the Thermidorian

The Transition from Prussian Conservatism to German Nationalism

Yesterday's geopolitical exigencies are today's sacred national traditions, and anyone who touches them is committing cultural genocide. So they say. The Junkers of their day were debating all the hot issues then in vogue. These included such riveting questions as whether their descendants (i.e. you) would be subjects of composite dynastic states that emerged as results of centuries of succession conflicts, appanages, condominiums, purchases, partible inheritances and other obscure devices from

Smash the Liègeoise

But it would be desirable in this respect, ecclesiastics and seculars, nobles and bourgeois, to unite, to make one family, for all but one public fund. and that all contribute in proportion to their property and their faculties. For this purpose a general meeting would be necessary; it would be necessary to put aside any esprit de corps which tends only to bring several states into a state by diversifying interests; which is the greatest of the political evils. It was quite anxious that all of t

The Old New Left: Student Radicalism in the 1930s

Ho Chi Minh! Ho Chi Minh! There has long prevailed a certain exceptionalism about the 1960s. It all went so well with the decade prior, with Father Knows Best on the air... and then, the Yippies are nominating a pig for President, "free love" reigns freely indeed, and the Jews sell America out in 1965. Except really big this time around. It wasn't that exceptional, not even the youthful vitality. For there was a student radical movement contemporaneous (sometimes collaborating with) the New Deal

Charles Reemelin's Critical Review of American Politics (1881)

[Best read as an appendix to the previous article on electoral violence.] Charles Reemelin was a man who hated America. Not out of envy, spite or hatred, but out of in-depth personal experience. Sure, he insisted on simply being a patriot who sought to deliver America from the tyranny of partyism, but the subtext is obvious, especially in his case. On the other hand, his vision of what America's political future ought to be was, sans a few of his Teutonic eccentricities, on the money in terms of

Electoral Violence in America, or: Why Your Country Had to Be Pozzed

M.G. Miles over at Those Who Can See, has recently compiled an article on the hidden history of American demographics. It is one of the most capable presentations of the "cumulative migration" thesis of American decline: that successive waves of migration from Southern and Eastern Europe and ultimately from elsewhere have diluted the Anglo-American native stock and destroyed social capital, leading to today's Weimerican Republic. Indeed, M.G. actually understates his case in that particular post

The Communist Origins Of Modern American Free Speech

Anti-anti-communism used to be a mainstay of left-liberal opinion. Even the nominally “anti-communistic” faction of social democrats and socialists from the DSA and Dissent magazine camps — the Irving Howes, the Michael Harringtons, the Tom Kahns — expressed their anti-communism to the extent that they denounced “totalitarian” encroachments on liberal values of some sort. However, anti-anti-communism is now a part of the political right also. Bolsheviks didn’t like homos, either! Stalin outlawed

Communalists and Constitutionalists

Liberalism and democracy are not the same, as I've mentioned in the context of the doctrinaires and ancients v. moderns. "Illiberal democracy" is used as an epithet to refer to various top-heavy presidential or parliamentary republics where elections serve a mostly symbolic role to give the dog (the public) a bone. And I don't mean blow them like in the AC/DC song. Although, figuratively, this may indeed be it. But that's quite a limited way of grasping the distinction. Instead let's use a dicho